What’s the Difference Between the Australian Shepherd and the Australian Cattle Dog?

Australian Shepherd dog

Mary Bloom/American Kennel Club

The Australian Shepherd

Animated, adaptable, and agile, the Australian Shepherd lives for his job, which still involves herding livestock and working as an all-purpose farm and ranch dog. He needs a lot of activity and a sense of purpose to be truly content. Today, due to the breed’s intelligence and versatility, “Aussies” also excel in AKC events such as agility, obedience, and herding. Their coats can be black, blue merle, red merle, and red with or without white markings. There are many theories about the origin of the Australian Shepherd. Despite its misleading name, the breed as we know it today probably developed in the Pyrenees Mountains somewhere between Spain and France. It was called the Australian Shepherd because of its association with Basque shepherds who came to America from Australia in the 1800s. The Australian Shepherd was initially called by many names, including Spanish Shepherd, Pastor Dog, Bob-Tail, New Mexican Shepherd, and California Shepherd.
An energetic breed with strong herding and guarding instincts, the Aussie requires daily vigorous exercise. Although sometimes reserved with strangers, they are “people” dogs that want to always be near their families. Their thick coats require weekly brushing.

  • Herding Group; AKC recognized in 1991
  • Ranging in size from 18 to 23 inches tall at the shoulder
  • Sheep herder; farm dog

Australian Cattle Dog

Mary Bloom/American Kennel Club

The Australian Cattle Dog

Without peer as a cattle herder, the Australian Cattle Dog (ACD) is ready and willing to work all day. Their agility, strength, and courageousness allow them to easily control and move cattle in both open and confined spaces. Stubborn cows don’t discourage this dog—ACDs just become more determined to get the job done! In the 1800s, Australians began crossing Dingo-blue merle Collies to Dalmatians and Black and Tan Kelpies. The result was a dog identical in type and build to the Dingo, only with a thicker set and peculiar markings—and also an excellent worker. Known originally as the Blue or Australian Heeler, the ACD has been a huge help to the Australian beef industry, enabling farmers to maintain huge herds.
Happiest in wide-open spaces, ACDs are very high-energy dogs and extremely intelligent, so they need a job—such as herding, obedience or agility—to keep them happy. While wary of strangers, the breed bonds closely to its family, though the owner must establish themselves as the pack leader. Their smooth, short coat requires only occasional baths and brushing.

  • Herding Group; AKC recognized in 1980
  • Ranging in size from 17 to 20 inches tall at the shoulder
  • Cattle herder, livestock guardian

What’s the Difference Between the Pekingese and the Japanese Chin?

Pekingese dog

Mary Bloom/American Kennel Club

The Pekingese

The Pekingese is a well-balanced, compact dog of Chinese origin with a heavy front and lighter hindquarters. They are small dogs but are not to be considered delicate or dainty. Their image is lion-like, implying courage, dignity, boldness, and self-esteem. They can be any colour. Chinese art throughout the ages, starting with the Tang dynasty of the 8th century, abounds with images of the Pekingese, who gets his name from the ancient city of Peking, now called Beijing. Pekingese were held sacred in ancient China and could only be owned by royalty. At that time, the punishment for stealing a Pekingese was death. Pekingese possess a regal dignity, intelligence, and self-importance, making them good natured, opinionated, and affectionate family companions.

  • Toy Group; AKC recognized in 1906
  • Weighs less than 14 pounds
  • Watchdog, canine companion

Japanese chin

Mary Bloom/American Kennel Club

The Japanese Chin

The Japanese Chin’s origin and development in its native land of China is wrapped in royalty and adoration. They were bred for the sole purpose of accompanying the ladies of the Imperial Palace and warming the laps of Chinese aristocracy. There are illustrations on ancient pottery and embroideries that are centuries old, and evidence suggests that one could not purchase a Chin—they were kept in the hands of the nobility and frequently given as gifts of esteem to diplomats and to foreigners who rendered some outstanding service to Japan. The Japanese Chin is a bright, alert, and playful breed.

  • Toy Group; AKC recognized in 1888
  • Ranging from 8 to 11 inches tall (typically 4 to 15 pounds)
  • Companion dog

What’s the Difference Between the Greyhound and the Whippet?

 

THE GREYHOUND

Tall and lean, the Greyhound is the fastest breed of dog. As a sight hound, the breed pursues game using its vision and speed. Today, however, the Greyhound primarily serves as a sweet and personable companion. The breed can be any colour, including black, fawn, and red, often combined with white or brindle markings.

• Hound Group; AKC recognized in 1885 • Ranging in size from 60
to 70 pounds • Hare hunter

THE WHIPPET

In fact, the Whippet is an English Greyhound in miniature, hence the layman
frequently confusing the two breeds. A medium-sized sighthound, it gives
the appearance of elegance and fitness, denoting great speed, power, and
balance. The Whippet is the fastest domesticated animal of his weight,
capable of speeds up to 35 m.p.h. A very versatile breed, they can appear
in a wide variety of colours and markings. Although keen when racing or
coursing, they are quiet and dignified in their owner’s living room.

• Hound Group; AKC recognized in 1888.• Ranging in
size from 18 to 22 inches tall (typically 20 to 40 pounds)
• Race dog; rabbit courser

What’s the Difference Between the Greyhound and the Italian Greyhound?

THE GREYHOUND

Tall and lean, the Greyhound is the fastest breed of dog. As a sight hound, the breed pursues game using its vision and speed. Today, however, the Greyhound primarily serves as a sweet and personable companion. The breed can be any colour, including black, fawn, and red, often combined with white or brindle markings.

• Hound Group; AKC recognized in 1885 • Ranging in size from 60
to 70 pounds • Hare hunter

THE ITALIAN GREYHOUND

The Italian Greyhound is extremely slender and barely over a foot tall, but has all the grace and sweetness of his taller Greyhound relatives. There is debate as to whether they were originally bred for hunting small game or meant to be simply a companion. In all likelihood, both are true, as they are adaptable to city and country life. Playful and intelligent, the Italian Greyhound is generally easy to train and prefers to spend most of his time with his owner. They like attention and affection, and are a peaceful, gentle friend to adults and children. Italian Greyhounds are an active breed that loves to run and play and requires daily walks. Their small size makes them ideal for an apartment and his short, smooth as satin coat makes him one of the easiest breeds to groom.

• Toy Group; AKC recognized in 1886 • Ranging from 13 to 15 inches tall (typically 8 to 18 pounds) • Companion, small game hunter

Dogify Your Inbox

Sign up for the FREE Modern Dog Magazine newsletter & get the best of Modern Dog delivered to your inbox.

"*" indicates required fields

Consent*
This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

By clicking the arrow, you agree to our web Terms of Use and Privacy & Cookie Policy. Easy unsubscribe links are provided in every email.