Miniature Pinscher

Miniature Pinscher

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Min Pins are often mistakenly attributed as a relative of Dobermans, when they really have no relation at all. In fact, the Miniature Pinscher is thought to predate Dobermans by about 200 years. It is believed they were bred into existence by crossing Dachshunds, German Pinschers, and Italian Greyhounds. The Min Pin is in art from as early as the 1600s, although it wasn’t until the 1800s that that they became a distinct breed, and it took another 100 years after that for them to start participating in dog shows. They’re of German descent and were originally bred as ratters in Scandinavian countries, before becoming internationally popular. They were recognized by the AKC in 1929 in the Terrier group, but were reclassified in 1930 as a Toy breed.

When it comes to personality, Miniature Pinschers know they’re the best. They’re extremely confidant and dangerously fearless—they’ll never back down from a fight despite their diminutive size. They’re also very curious and love investigating anything new or unusual. This can sometimes get them into trouble if your house isn’t puppy-proofed.

Min Pins are a very busy breed, which, on top of their curiosity, makes them master escape artists. If there’s a way out of the house, he’ll find it. Crate training is highly recommended for this breed to ease worries in the middle of the night. Because they’re such a high-energy breed, they need lots of mental stimulation in the way of toys and socialization. It is also recommended to enroll them in puppy training classes at a young age so they get exposure to other dogs.

Due to their strong personalities, Min Pins are not recommended for beginner dog owners. They need a human companion who can be their pack leader and keep them in line.

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