Seattle, WA

Seattle, WA

0

Eat

Norm’s Eatery & Ale House

460 N 36th St.
(206) 547-1417

If you are in need of a pub “where everybody knows your (dog’s) name,” then Norm’s is your destination. Located 15 minutes north of downtown Seattle in the quaint Freemont district, Norm’s is a great place to grab a burger and a brew with your furry pal in tow. The super dog-friendly bar and eatery is named after the owner’s dog, Norm, and the bar’s decor is a tribute to man’s (and woman’s) best friend, with pictures of canine pals hung all over the walls. This place is, as one of the clientele claimed, “a dog lover’s dream.” Definitely a great place to stop by with your dog and make some new friends.

The Beveridge Place Pub

6413 California Ave. SW
(206) 932-9906

This place might be a little bit out of the way for tourists but it’s a fun hangout and definitely worth the effort if you are looking for a true Seattle experience. With its wide selection of beers and laid-back atmosphere, this place has Northwest Coast written all over it. The bar is a beautiful mahogany antique piece and the place offers fun activities like pool, foozball, and board games. Best of all, though, dogs are welcome! beveridgeplacepub.com

Pink Door

1919 Post Alley
(206) 443-3241

If you’re in search of a small restaurant with lots of ambience and delicious food, look no further than the Pink Door. The Italian restaurant is conveniently located in Post Alley in the heart of Pike Place Market, with a great view overlooking the bay. The elegant setting serves lunches and dinners that you and your four-legged friend can both can enjoy—dogs are welcome inside. thepinkdoor.net

Stay

Sorrento Hotel

900 Madison St.
(206) 622-6400

The beautiful Hotel Sorrento delivers lavish, turn-of-last-century Italianate style in a central location, just a hop, skip, and a bark away from Pioneer Square and Pike Place Market. You can trust your dog will enjoy her stay; for a $60 fee, your room will be stocked with a plush dog bed, organic treats, and water and food bowls. On request, the hotel will also set up doggie daycare services, on-site grooming, and, in case your dog is channeling some west coast vibes, a pet psychic. As in many hotels, dogs must be crated or out of the room when staff services the room. Dogs of any size are warmly welcomed. hotelsorrento.com

Alexis Hotel

1007 First Ave.
(206) 624-4844

The Alexis Hotel marries modern, Northwest-coast flavour with the luxury and comfort associated with Kimpton hotels. Located just blocks from Pike Place Market, the hotel is perfectly situated for taking a stroll with your dog. Upon return to your room—each is uniquely decorated—your dog will no doubt be thrilled. The hotel offers each canine guest a designer dog bed, a water bowl with distilled water, and a selection of freshly baked treats from Three Dog Bakery. Best of all, the Alexis imposes no fees or size restrictions, and no crating is required. And then there’s the dog-menu room service: mouth-watering meals for your pooch are on offer, ready to be delivered straight to your door. alexishotel.com

Hotel Max

620 Stewart St.
(206) 728-6299

If you and your dog are looking for an artistic experience during your stay in Seattle, Hotel Max is for you. This cool Provenance hotel is all about art; original works are showcased throughout the hotel. This, combined with the simple yet lavish details that characterize the Max’s approach, ensures your stay will most definitely be unique. Dogs are welcome and spoiled at this hotel. A $40 fee gains a dog of any size entrance and includes dog bed and bowls, lots of treats and bottled water, and a welcome note. hotelmaxseattle.com

Play

Metro Transit

Do some sightseeing on the city bus—take public transport! Seattle’s Metro buses (the yellow and green ones) are canine-friendly. Service animals for persons with disabilities ride without charge, as do small dogs that will fit in their owners’ laps. Large dogs pay the same fare as their owners but may not occupy a seat; they should ride on the floor of the coach next to their owner. If you'll be transferring, be sure to get a transfer for your dog, too, so you don't have to pay your dog's fare twice. Dog admittance is subject to driver discretion, so if there are already other dogs riding, it is possible (though rare) that you will be refused service. Note that Sound Transit buses (the blue and white express freeway buses) only allow small dogs in carriers. transit.metrokc.gov

Warren G. Magnuson Park

7400 Sand Point Way NE

Encompassing 350 acres, including a mile-long stretch of coast line along Lake Washington, Warren G. Magnuson is Seattle’s largest park. Your dog won’t be short of free-running green space here; nine acres have been set aside for an off-leash area where your dog can run, jump, and play to his heart’s content.

Dr. Jose Rizal

1008 12th Ave. S. on North Beacon Hill

The northern part of this park is a fenced, off-leash area offering a lush setting for your dog to romp, as well as a great view of Puget Sound. Should Fluffy need a bit of refreshment, a water fountain can be found on the main trail.

Plymouth Pillars

Borean Ave. and Pike St.

This conveniently located downtown dog park offers an off-leash area for your pooch. Though the narrow gravel park might not be ideal, it does offer a great view of the city and is a good place to take a break from shopping and burn off some excess dog-energy.

GroomingSPA Seattle

308 NE 72 St.
(206) 527-2707

While in Greenlake, stop in at GroomingSpa Seattle for some poochie pampering. From a jetted tub to a doggie treadmill, this full-service spa has it all. groomingspa.com

Seattle Art Museum’s “Sculpture Park"

2901 Weston Ave

Get some culture and some exercise at Seattle Art Museum’s free admission sculpture park. Leash Rover and stroll through the SAM’s collection of local artists’ sculptures. seattleartmuseum.org

Shop

Urban Beast

217 Yale Ave N
(206) 324-4400
This great boutique targets the urbanite dog and her human caretaker, with a BYOB (bring your own beast) store policy. Not only do they offer a variety of dog bowls, beds, and treats, they also offer evening social events—in short, everything a city-dwelling mongrel could need, or, more to the point, want.
urbanbeast-seattle.com

Eat

<div class="section">
<div class="left-column">
<h3>
Norm’s Eatery &amp; Ale House</h3>460 N 36th St.<br />
(206) 547-1417 <br />
If you are in need of a pub “where everybody knows your (dog’s) name,” then Norm’s is your destination. Located 15 minutes north of downtown Seattle in the quaint Freemont district, Norm’s is a great place to grab a burger and a brew with your furry pal in tow. The super dog-friendly bar and eatery is named after the owner’s dog, Norm, and the bar’s decor is a tribute to man’s (and woman’s) best friend, with pictures of canine pals hung all over the walls. This place is, as one of the clientele claimed, “a dog lover’s dream.” Definitely a great place to stop by with your dog and make some new friends. <img src="/sites/default/files/images/uploads/norms.jpg" width="200" height="240" />
</div>
<div class="right-column">
<h3>The Beveridge Place Pub</h3>
6413 California Ave. SW <br />
(206) 932-9906<br />
This place might be a little bit out of the way for tourists but it’s a fun hangout and definitely worth the effort if you are looking for a true Seattle experience. With its wide selection of beers and laid-back atmosphere, this place has Northwest Coast written all over it. The bar is a beautiful mahogany antique piece and the place offers fun activities like pool, foozball, and board games. Best of all, though, dogs are welcome! <br />
<em><a href="http://beveridgeplacepub.com/" target="_blank">beveridgeplacepub.com</a></em><br />
<h3>Pink Door</h3>
1919 Post Alley<br />
(206) 443-3241<br />
If you’re in search of a small restaurant with lots of ambience and delicious food, look no further than the Pink Door. The Italian restaurant is conveniently located in Post Alley in the heart of Pike Place Market, with a great view overlooking the bay. The elegant setting serves lunches and dinners that you and your four-legged friend can both can enjoy—dogs are welcome inside <br />
<em><a href="/thepinkdoor.net" target="_blank">thepinkdoor.net</a></em>
</div>
</div>

Stay

Arctic Club Hotel

700 3rd Ave. (at Cherry)
(206) 340-0340
Seattle’s newest boutique hotel, The Arctic Club, is steeped in history. Housed in the glorious Arctic Club Building founded in 1908 as a private gentlemen’s club for Klondike gold rush “entrepreneurs,” the redressed locale offers many pleasures, from the old-world lobby bar to the charming preserved architectural details. Pictures of the original club members. along with sepia portraits of Inuit still line the walls, greeting hotel patrons. The luxurious, old-world décor is a reminiscent nod to this adventurous era but with all the modern comforts: free wifi and HBO, flat-screen TVs and room service from the hotel restaurant, JUNO (mantra: local, sustainable, organic). There is $75 non-refundable fee for bringing Buddy along and a size limit of 75 pounds. A cozy bed and food and water bowls await your dog and the concierge is happy to arrange walking/sitting services. arctichotelseattle.com


Sorrento Hotel

900 Madison St.
(206) 622-6400
The beautiful Hotel Sorrento delivers lavish, turn-of-last-century Italianate style in a central location, just a hop, skip, and a bark away from Pioneer Square and Pike Place Market. You can trust your dog will enjoy her stay; for a $60 fee, your room will be stocked with a plush dog bed, organic treats, and water and food bowls. On request, the hotel will also set up doggie daycare services, on-site grooming, and, in case your dog is channeling some west coast vibes, a pet psychic. As in many hotels, dogs must be crated or out of the room when staff services the room. Dogs of any size are warmly welcomed. hotelsorrento.com

Alexis Hotel

1007 First Ave.
(206) 624-4844
The Alexis Hotel marries modern, Northwest-coast flavour with the luxury and comfort associated with Kimpton hotels. Located just blocks from Pike Place Market, the hotel is perfectly situated for taking a stroll with your dog. Upon return to your room—each is uniquely decorated—your dog will no doubt be thrilled. The hotel offers each canine guest a designer dog bed, a water bowl with distilled water, and a selection of freshly baked treats from Three Dog Bakery. Best of all, the Alexis imposes no fees or size restrictions, and no crating is required. And then there’s the dog-menu room service: mouth-watering meals for your pooch are on offer, ready to be delivered straight to your door. alexishotel.com

Hotel Max

620 Stewart St.
(206) 728-6299
If you and your dog are looking for an artistic experience during your stay in Seattle, Hotel Max is for you. This cool Provenance hotel is all about art; original works are showcased throughout the hotel. This, combined with the simple yet lavish details that characterize the Max’s approach, ensures your stay will most definitely be unique. Dogs are welcome and spoiled at this hotel. A $40 fee gains a dog of any size entrance and includes dog bed and bowls, lots of treats and bottled water, and a welcome note.
hotelmaxseattle.com
 

Play

Metro Transit

Do some sightseeing on the city bus—take public transport! Seattle’s Metro buses (the yellow and green ones) are canine-friendly. Service animals for persons with disabilities ride without charge, as do small dogs that will fit in their owners’ laps. Large dogs pay the same fare as their owners but may not occupy a seat; they should ride on the floor of the coach next to their owner. If you'll be transferring, be sure to get a transfer for your dog, too, so you don't have to pay your dog's fare twice. Dog admittance is subject to driver discretion, so if there are already other dogs riding, it is possible (though rare) that you will be refused service. Note that Sound Transit buses (the blue and white express freeway buses) only allow small dogs in carriers. transit.metrokc.gov

Warren G. Magnuson Park

7400 Sand Point Way NE



Encompassing 350 acres, including a mile-long stretch of coast line along Lake Washington, Warren G. Magnuson is Seattle’s largest park. Your dog won’t be short of free-running green space here; nine acres have been set aside for an off-leash area where your dog can run, jump, and play to his heart’s content.

Dr. Jose Rizal

1008 12th Ave. S. on North Beacon Hill
The northern part of this park is a fenced, off-leash area offering a lush setting for your dog to romp, as well as a great view of Puget Sound. Should Fluffy need a bit of refreshment, a water fountain can be found on the main trail.
 

Plymouth Pillars

Borean Ave. and Pike St.
This conveniently located downtown dog park offers an off-leash area for your pooch. Though the narrow gravel park might not be ideal, it does offer a great view of the city and is a good place to take a break from shopping and burn off some excess dog-energy.

GroomingSPA Seattle

308 NE 72 St.
(206) 527-2707
While in Greenlake, stop in at GroomingSpa Seattle for some poochie pampering. From a jetted  tub to a doggie treadmill, this full-service spa has it all. groomingspa.com

Seattle Art Museum’s “Sculpture Park"

2901 Weston Ave
Get some culture and some exercise at Seattle Art Museum’s free admission sculpture park. Leash Rover and stroll through the SAM’s collection of local artists’ sculptures.
seattleartmuseum.org 

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